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Quiz: What Should I Feed This Cat?

Deborah E. Linder, DVM, MS, DACVN, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University

Nutrition

|October 2015|Peer Reviewed|Web-Exclusive

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Dietary considerations vary for every patient, especially cats. This self-quiz is designed to test your nutrition knowledge for everyday feline cases.

7  Questions
Multiple Choice Questions
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Quiz: What Should I Feed This Cat?

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1/7  Questions
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Maddie, a 9-year-old spayed domestic short-haired cat, presented for her first weigh-in after starting a weight loss program. The initial pre–weight loss physical examination had revealed no abnormalities other than a body condition score of 9/9 with normal muscle mass. The cat’s starting weight had been 18 lb (8.1 kg), with an estimated ideal weight goal of 12 lb (5.4 kg). Based on dietary history of receiving 300 kcal from the current diet and calculating 80% of the cat’s current estimated caloric intake, the cat was started on a therapeutic diet at 240 kcal. After the cat was fed the veterinary therapeutic diet for 2 weeks, the client is upset that Maddie has gained, now weighing 18.2 lb (8.2 kg). The owners noted that Maddie is otherwise doing well and is not begging for food.

Which of the following would be the next best step for this cat?

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Quiz: What Should I Feed This Cat?
2/7  Questions
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Casey, a 10-year-old castrated domestic short-haired cat, was recently diagnosed with diabetes mellitus. Physical examination revealed a body condition score of 7/9 and normal muscle mass. Initially the client did not want to change the cat’s diet as recommended. After 1 month of glargine insulin therapy at 1 unit SC twice a day, clinical signs and fructosamine levels suggested that the diabetes was well-regulated. However, the client now wants to change the cat’s diet (currently at 10 grams of carbohydrates per 100 kcal) to a lower carbohydrate diet after reading that this could help achieve remission.

Which of the following nutrient profiles would best fit the cat’s needs at this time?

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Quiz: What Should I Feed This Cat?
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Milo, a 5-year-old castrated domestic long-haired cat, presented with a second occurrence of urethral obstruction (previous obstruction had involved struvite crystalluria). Physical examination revealed a mild (II/VI) systolic heart murmur, along with a distended firm bladder on abdominal palpation. The cat was otherwise in good condition, with a body condition score of 5/9 and normal muscle tone. The obstruction was relieved and calculi were collected for analysis, and the cat was hospitalized on fluid therapy for a couple days. Once the laboratory results normalized, the client was ready to take the cat home but expressed concerns about the ongoing costs of treatment (ie, veterinary therapeutic diets) and potential future obstructions. Stone analysis from this occurrence was still pending at time of discharge.

Which of the following statements is true?

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Quiz: What Should I Feed This Cat?
4/7  Questions
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Chessie, a 9-year-old spayed domestic short-haired cat, presented as a healthy patient for a senior wellness exam. Senior screening blood work revealed no abnormalities, and the cat was in excellent condition, with a body condition score of 5/9 and normal muscle mass. Physical examination revealed no significant abnormalities except for moderate-to-severe dental calculus and gingivitis. After setting up a dental cleaning, the client asked whether diets or supplements might help manage the cat’s teeth.

What is the most appropriate plan for this cat?

Select one of the above choices and click submit.
Quiz: What Should I Feed This Cat?
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Bandit and Snickers are 12-year-old spayed Persian littermates. Both cats are mildly overweight, with 6/9 body condition scores but normal muscle mass. During a recent physical wellness examination, Bandit was diagnosed with chronic kidney disease (CKD), based on urea nitrogen of 40 mg/dL [14.28 mmol/L] (reference range, 19-34 mg/dL; 6.783-12.138 mmol/L), creatinine of 2.4 mg/dL [212.16 µmol/L] (reference range, 0.9-2.2 mg/dL; [79.56-194.48 µmol/L]), and urine specific gravity of 1.020 (reference range, 1.001–1.070). All other serum chemistry values were within normal limits, and no hematologic or urinalysis abnormalities were found. The rest of the wellness examination also was uneventful. Snickers had no abnormalities on physical examination and all test results were within normal limits. The client is concerned about separating the cats if different feeding regimens are needed.

Regarding the care of both cats, what advice should the clinician give?

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Quiz: What Should I Feed This Cat?
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Frisky, a 3-year-old castrated domestic short-haired cat, presented for a 3-week history of anorexia. The family had recently moved, and the cat seemed stressed, hiding and refusing to eat. The client had thought the cat’s behavior would subside, but after 3 weeks decided to take him for veterinary assessment. Physical examination revealed a 7/9 body condition score and mild muscle wasting. Mildly elevated liver enzymes were found on blood work, and abdominal ultrasonography revealed a diffusely hyperechoic liver. While no obvious cause was apparent, the potential for hepatic lipidosis and need for careful nutritional management were discussed with the client.

What is the best treatment strategy at this time?

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Quiz: What Should I Feed This Cat?
7/7  Questions
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Casper is a 6-year-old spayed Maine coon cat. During a routine vaccination and wellness visit, the client notes that the cat’s haircoat has been dry and wonders whether Casper is allergic to grains. Physical examination reveals a body condition score of 6/9, normal muscle mass, and no significant abnormalities other than seborrhea sicca and pruritus. Dietary history reveals a variety of grocery and commercial dry diets of different protein and carbohydrate sources.

What should the clinician recommend to rule out a food-related cause of seborrhea?

Select one of the above choices and click submit.
Quiz: What Should I Feed This Cat?
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Quiz: What Should I Feed This Cat?

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