Content continues after advertisement

Quiz: Understanding GI Testing

M. Katherine Tolbert, DVM, PhD, DACVIM (SAIM), Texas A&M University

Clinical Pathology

|August 2019|Peer Reviewed|Web-Exclusive

Sign in to Print/View PDF

Quiz: Understanding GI Testing

GI signs are a common presentation in dogs and cats. Increased availability of diagnostics can improve the quality of care for veterinary patients with GI disease but can also present a diagnostic challenge to veterinarians when choosing appropriate tests and interpreting results. This quiz will help address frequent misconceptions about some of the most commonly used GI diagnostic tests.

8  Questions
Multiple Choice Questions
Score 0/8

Quiz: Understanding GI Testing

Take this quiz by answering the following multiple choice questions.
1/8  Questions
Score
Score 0/8

A 2-year-old neutered male crossbreed dog (Figure 1) is presented for polyphagia, severe weight loss, and chronic diarrhea.

Clinician's Brief

The most sensitive and specific test for diagnosis of canine exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) measures which of the following?

Select one of the above choices and click submit.
Quiz: Understanding GI Testing
2/8  Questions
Score
Score 0/8

The owner of the dog in question 1 read online about potential causes of the dog’s GI signs and started the dog on fresh raw bovine pancreas approximately 5 days prior to presentation.

Before the dog is evaluated for exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI), which of the following should be recommended?

Select one of the above choices and click submit.
Quiz: Understanding GI Testing
3/8  Questions
Score
Score 0/8

Portia, a 9-year-old spayed domestic shorthair cat, is presented for evaluation of chronic vomiting, weight loss, and anorexia. The patient is receiving a monthly preventive containing selamectin but no other medications. She defecated in her carrier on the way into  the clinic; the stool was dark and tarry.

A minimum database is performed. Abnormalities include moderate, nonregenerative anemia and hypoproteinemia. On abdominal ultrasonography, gastric ulceration is suspected. 

Prior to starting the cat on gastroprotectant drugs (eg, omeprazole, sucralfate), which of the following tests should be submitted? 

Select one of the above choices and click submit.
Quiz: Understanding GI Testing
4/8  Questions
Score
Score 0/8

Which of the following is false regarding the serum gastrin assay in dogs and cats?

Select one of the above choices and click submit.
Quiz: Understanding GI Testing
5/8  Questions
Score
Score 0/8

A 2-year-old neutered male Birman cat is presented for diarrhea of 3 months’ duration. The diarrhea is characterized by tenesmus, hematochezia, frequent defecation, and large-volume stools. The cat improves with metronidazole but the diarrhea recurs with drug cessation. 

The diarrhea is best characterized as which of the following?

Select one of the above choices and click submit.
Quiz: Understanding GI Testing
6/8  Questions
Score
Score 0/8

A Diff-Quik test is prepared from an air-dried wet mount sample of feces from the cat in question 5, which was collected with a fecal collection loop and diluted with saline (Figure 2).

Clinician's Brief

Based on cytologic examination, which of the following tests could be used to confirm the diagnosis?

Select one of the above choices and click submit.
Quiz: Understanding GI Testing
7/8  Questions
Score
Score 0/8

An 11-year-old spayed American cocker spaniel is presented with chronic, intermittent diarrhea of approximately 5 years’ duration. In the last 6 months, the dog has lost weight and exhibited an altered appetite that ranges from hyporexia to polyphagia. Over the last week, the dog has developed intermittent vomiting. Cranial abdominal pain is detected on physical examination. Abdominal ultrasonography reveals a heterogeneously echogenic pancreas and hyperechoic peripancreatic fat.

Serum GI Panel Findings
  • Cobalamin (Vitamin B12): 300 ng/L (RR: 251-908 ng/L)
  • Folate (Vitamin B9): 11.3 μg/L (RR: 7.7-24.4 µg/L)
  • cTLI (trypsin-like immunoreactivity): 3.0 μg/L (RR: 5.7-45.2 µg/L)
  • cPLI (pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity): 523 μg/L (RR: ≤200 µg/L)

Which of the following tests could be used to determine whether the dog may benefit from cobalamin supplementation?

Select one of the above choices and click submit.
Quiz: Understanding GI Testing
8/8  Questions
Score
Score 0/8
Serum GI Panel Findings
  • Cobalamin (Vitamin B12): 300 ng/L (RR: 251-908 ng/L)
  • Folate (Vitamin B9): 11.3 μg/L (RR: 7.7-24.4 µg/L)
  • cTLI (trypsin-like immunoreactivity): 3.0 μg/L (RR: 5.7-45.2 µg/L)
  • cPLI (pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity): 523 μg/L (RR: ≤200 µg/L)

Which of the following is false regarding the GI panel?

Select one of the above choices and click submit.
Quiz: Understanding GI Testing
8/8  Questions
Multiple Choice Questions
Score 0/8

Quiz: Understanding GI Testing

Final score
0 of 8

References

For global readers, a calculator to convert laboratory values, dosages, and other measurements to SI units can be found here.

Material from Clinician's Brief may not be reproduced, distributed, or used in whole or in part without prior permission of Educational Concepts, LLC. For questions or inquiries please contact us.

Podcasts

Clinician's Brief:
The Podcast

Listen as host Beckie Mossor, RVT, talks with the authors of your favorite Clinician’s Brief articles. Dig deeper and explore the conversations behind the content here.
Clinician's Brief provides relevant diagnostic and treatment information for small animal practitioners. It has been ranked the #1 most essential publication by small animal veterinarians for 9 years.*

*2007-2017 PERQ and Essential Media Studies

© 2018 Educational Concepts, L.L.C. dba Brief Media ™ All Rights Reserved. Privacy Policy (Updated 05/08/2018) Terms of Use (Updated 05/08/2018)