Content continues after advertisement

Quiz: Re-Emerging Infectious Diseases in Dogs

Jonathan Dear, DVM, DACVIM (SAIM), University of California, Davis

Infectious Disease

|January 2018|Peer Reviewed

Sign in to Print/View PDF

Recognizing infectious diseases can be challenging, as clinical signs and laboratory findings are often similar among diseases and may mimic neoplastic or immune-mediated disease. The cases presented here illustrate how some uncommon but re-emerging infectious diseases can be identified rapidly and treated appropriately. 

CASE 1

A 3-year-old, neutered male crossbreed sighthound is presented with a week-long history of lethargy and progressive loss of appetite. The dog was recently adopted from a shelter in the Los Angeles area and appeared healthy at adoption. He received all core vaccinations and was neutered while under the care of the shelter.

On physical examination, the veterinarian notices pale mucous membranes with pinpoint petechiae (Figure 1). Abdominal palpation reveals moderate splenomegaly. The remainder of the examination is within normal limits.

Clinician's Brief

CBC results reveal normal values for lymphocytes, monocytes, eosinophils, and basophils. However, the following parameters are outside reference ranges:

Table

Parameter Value Reference Interval
Hematocrit (%) 28.3 40-55
MCV (fL) 87.6 65-75
MCHC (g/dL) (SI: g/L) 29.7 (297) 33-36 (330-360)
WBC (cells/µL) (SI: x 109/L) 3460 (3.46) 6000-13 000 (6-13)
Neutrophils (cells/µL) (SI: x 109/L) 1592 (1.59) 3000-10 500 (3.0-10.5)
Platelets (cells/µL) (SI: x 109/L) 85 000 (85) 150 000-400 000 (150-400)
MPV (fL)  23.0 7-13

MCHC = mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, MCV = mean corpuscular volume, MPV = mean platelet volume

3  Questions
Multiple Choice Questions
Score 0/3

Infectious Diseases in Dogs: Case 1

Take this quiz by answering the following multiple choice questions.
1/3  Questions
Score
Score 0/3

While reviewing a blood smear slide, the technologist finds an intraerythrocytic parasite (Figure 2).


 



   


 


 

 



   


 


 

FIGURE 2      

FIGURE 2      

Which answer best matches the image?

Select one of the above choices and click submit.
Infectious Diseases in Dogs: Case 1
2/3  Questions
Score
Score 0/3

Babesiosis treatment is based on the infecting species; in the United States, there are 3 predominant Babesia spp. The Babesia spp organism shown in Figure 2 is small.


 



   


 


 

 



   


 


 

FIGURE 2      

FIGURE 2      

Based on this information, which of the following Babesia selections are of greatest concern?

Select one of the above choices and click submit.
Infectious Diseases in Dogs: Case 1
3/3  Questions
Score
Score 0/3

Because either B gibsoni or B conradae infection is the likely diagnosis in this dog, which of the following would be most appropriate as first-line treatment?

Select one of the above choices and click submit.
Infectious Diseases in Dogs: Case 1
3/3  Questions
Multiple Choice Questions
Score 0/3

Infectious Diseases in Dogs: Case 1

Final score
0 of 3

CASE 2

A 4-year-old spayed German shepherd dog is presented to an emergency clinic for acute onset of paraparesis. On physical examination, the dog has an elevated temperature (103.2°F [39.6°C], normal 100°F-102.5°F (37.8°C-39.2°C), along with apparent pain on palpation of the thoracolumbar spine. Neurologic examination reveals a quiet dog with all appearances of appropriate mentation. All cranial nerves appear within normal limits, but the dog has delayed postural reactions bilaterally with increased segmental reflexes in the pelvic limbs. The thoracic limbs appear unaffected. Fundic examination reveals an ill-defined area of hyporeflectivity in the tapetum.

2  Questions
Multiple Choice Questions
Score 0/2

Infectious Diseases in Dogs: Case 2

Take this quiz by answering the following multiple choice questions.
1/2  Questions
Score
Score 0/2

Spinal radiographs reveal mixed lytic and proliferative lesions in the vertebral endplates, as shown in Figure 4. Abdominal sonograms reveal multicentric mesenteric lymphadenopathy and moderate renal pyelectasis with echogenic fluid within the renal pelvises.


 



   


 


 

 



   


 


 

Figure 4      

Figure 4      

Which of the following tests would not be an appropriate next diagnostic step for this patient?

Select one of the above choices and click submit.
Infectious Diseases in Dogs: Case 2
2/2  Questions
Score
Score 0/2

Cytology results of the sample obtained from this patients mesenteric lymph node via percutaneous, ultrasound-guided aspiration are compatible with fungal lymphadenitis, and urine culture is positive for Aspergillus spp.

Based on examination and test findings, which of the following treatments would not be appropriate?

Select one of the above choices and click submit.
Infectious Diseases in Dogs: Case 2
2/2  Questions
Multiple Choice Questions
Score 0/2

Infectious Diseases in Dogs: Case 2

Final score
0 of 2

For global readers, a calculator to convert laboratory values, dosages, and other measurements to SI units can be found here.

Material from Clinician's Brief may not be reproduced, distributed, or used in whole or in part without prior permission of Educational Concepts, LLC. For questions or inquiries please contact us.

Podcasts

Clinician's Brief:
The Podcast

Listen as host Beckie Mossor, RVT, talks with the authors of your favorite Clinician’s Brief articles. Dig deeper and explore the conversations behind the content here.
Clinician's Brief provides relevant diagnostic and treatment information for small animal practitioners. It has been ranked the #1 most essential publication by small animal veterinarians for 9 years.*

*2007-2017 PERQ and Essential Media Studies

© Educational Concepts, L.L.C. dba Brief Media ™ All Rights Reserved. Privacy Policy (Updated 05/08/2018) Terms of Use (Updated 05/08/2018)