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MSM = methylsulfonylmethane

*Macroscopic hematuria occurs when the quantity of blood in urine is visible to the naked eye (eg, pink, red, dark brown in color; may contain blood clots). Microscopic hematuria is characterized by small numbers of RBCs in urine and is only visible during microscopic examination of urine sediment.4
+The timing of hematuria is not always diagnostically accurate.
Renal hematuria is often subclinical.

References and author information Show
References
  1. Runge JJ, Berent AC, Mayhew PD, Weisse C. Transvesicular percutaneous cystolithotomy for the retrieval of cystic and urethral calculi in dogs and cats: 27 cases (2006-2008). J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2011;239(3):344-349.
  2. Martinez I, Mattoon JS, Eaton KA, Chew DJ, DiBartola SP. Polypoid cystitis in 17 dogs (1978-2001). J Vet Intern Med. 2003;17(4):499-509.
  3. Berent AC, Weisse CW, Branter E, et al. Endoscopic-guided sclerotherapy for renal-sparing treatment of idiopathic renal hematuria in dogs: 6 cases (2010-2012). J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2013;242(11):1556-1563.
  4. Forrester SD. Diagnostic approach to hematuria in dogs and cats. Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract. 2004;34(4):849-866.

 

Suggested Reading

  • Laflamme DP, Hannah SS. Nutritional genomics. In: Ettinger SJ, Feldman EC, eds. Textbook of Veterinary Internal Medicine; vol 1. 7th ed. St. Louis, MO: Saunders Elsevier; 2010:163-166.
Authors

Gideon Daniel

DVM, DACVIM (SAIM) Friendship Hospital for Animals, Washington, DC

Gideon Daniel, DVM, DACVIM (SAIM), is a staff internist at Friendship Hospital for Animals, a private practice specialty hospital in Washington, DC. His interests include various subjects in internal medicine, including renal disease.

Mary Anna Labato

DVM, DACVIM (SAIM) Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University

Mary Anna Labato, DVM, DACVIM (SAIM), is clinical professor and section head in small animal medicine at Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University. She has a special interest in renal disease and interventional therapies.

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