Content continues after advertisement

Image Quiz: Cataracts and Nuclear Sclerosis in Dogs

Shelby Reinstein, DVM, DACVO, Veterinary Specialty & Emergency Center, Levittown, Pennsylvania

Ophthalmology

|February 2016|Peer Reviewed

Sign in to Print/View PDF

Image Quiz: Cataracts and Nuclear Sclerosis in Dogs

Loss of transparency to the lens, caused by both nuclear sclerosis and cataract, is a common finding in dogs. It is important to properly distinguish between these clinical entities, as cataracts require long-term monitoring and treatment.

Nuclear Sclerosis

Nuclear sclerosis, or hardening of the lens nucleus, is a consistent, age-related finding in dogs older than 7 years of age. Clinically, nuclear sclerosis appears as a spherical, opalescent haze to the central nucleus of the lens. The condition does not obscure the tapetal reflection, impede vision, or preclude examination of the retina.

Cataracts

Cataract formation results from abnormal lens metabolism with varying causes and clinical appearances. Cataracts are often classified by cause (eg, inherited, metabolic, age-related, traumatic) and stage of development (eg, incipient, immature, mature, hypermature). Inherited cataracts are commonly seen in middle-aged dogs (eg, bichon frise, Boston terrier, poodle, cocker spaniel). Diabetes mellitus is a common cause of rapidly progressive, bilateral cataract formation in dogs.

Related Articles How to Refer: Cataracts Image Gallery: Cataracts Painful Ocular Lesion

Incipient cataracts are focal opacities that comprise <15% of the lens volume. They can appear as wedge-shaped, punctate dots, or triangular opacities in the anterior or posterior lens cortex.

Clinically, incipient and immature cataracts are most easily detected using retroillumination by obtaining a tapetal reflection. By allowing the reflection to back-light the cataract, the examiner can delineate the cataract based on the degree of obstruction of the tapetal reflection. This technique can help distinguish cataract from nuclear sclerosis. Mature cataracts completely obscure the tapetal reflection, and hypermature cataracts have a sparkling appearance.

Match the Images

The following images exhibit nuclear sclerosis and cataracts in various stages of development. Match the image with the condition causing a hazy lens.

5  Questions
Multiple Choice Questions
Score 0/5

Image Quiz: Cataracts and Nuclear Sclerosis in Dogs

Take this quiz by answering the following multiple choice questions.
1/5  Questions
Score
Score 0/5

Clinician's Brief

Which answer best matches the image?

Select one of the above choices and click submit.
Image Quiz: Cataracts and Nuclear Sclerosis in Dogs
2/5  Questions
Score
Score 0/5

Clinician's Brief

Which answer best matches the image?

Select one of the above choices and click submit.
Image Quiz: Cataracts and Nuclear Sclerosis in Dogs
3/5  Questions
Score
Score 0/5

Clinician's Brief

Which answer best matches the image?

Select one of the above choices and click submit.
Image Quiz: Cataracts and Nuclear Sclerosis in Dogs
4/5  Questions
Score
Score 0/5

Clinician's Brief

Which answer best matches the image?

Select one of the above choices and click submit.
Image Quiz: Cataracts and Nuclear Sclerosis in Dogs
5/5  Questions
Score
Score 0/5

Clinician's Brief

Which answer best matches the image?

Select one of the above choices and click submit.
Image Quiz: Cataracts and Nuclear Sclerosis in Dogs
5/5  Questions
Multiple Choice Questions
Score 0/5

Image Quiz: Cataracts and Nuclear Sclerosis in Dogs

Final score
0 of 5

For global readers, a calculator to convert laboratory values, dosages, and other measurements to SI units can be found here.

Material from Clinician's Brief may not be reproduced, distributed, or used in whole or in part without prior permission of Educational Concepts, LLC. For questions or inquiries please contact us.

Podcasts

Clinician's Brief:
The Podcast

Listen as host Beckie Mossor, RVT, talks with the authors of your favorite Clinician’s Brief articles. Dig deeper and explore the conversations behind the content here.
Clinician's Brief provides relevant diagnostic and treatment information for small animal practitioners. It has been ranked the #1 most essential publication by small animal veterinarians for 9 years.*

*2007-2017 PERQ and Essential Media Studies

© Educational Concepts, L.L.C. dba Brief Media ™ All Rights Reserved. Privacy Policy (Updated 05/08/2018) Terms of Use (Updated 05/08/2018)