Quiz: Treating Active Heartworm Infection

Parasitology

|June 2019|Sponsored

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Sponsored by Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health

Melarsomine is the only FDA-approved adulticide for heartworms, but myths and misunderstandings about treatment still exist. Test your knowledge when it comes to treating heartworm infestation.

10  Questions
Multiple Choice Questions
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Quiz: Treating Active Heartworm Infection

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1/10  Questions
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Which of the following is/are an FDA-approved heartworm adulticide(s) in dogs?

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Quiz: Treating Active Heartworm Infection
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Which is NOT correct about administering melarsomine dihydrochloride?

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Quiz: Treating Active Heartworm Infection
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Which does NOT add to the risk for pulmonary thromboembolism after adulticidal therapy for heartworms?

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Quiz: Treating Active Heartworm Infection
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How long has IMMITICIDE® (melarsomine dihydrochloride) been FDA-approved? 

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Quiz: Treating Active Heartworm Infection
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Which of the following is/are NOT FDA-approved and NOT recommended by the American Heartworm Society for the treatment of adult heartworms?

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Quiz: Treating Active Heartworm Infection
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Based on current research, which type of macrocyclic lactone appears potentially affected by heartworm resistance?

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Quiz: Treating Active Heartworm Infection
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Once reconstituted with sterile water, IMMITICIDE® is stable as long as it is __________.

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Quiz: Treating Active Heartworm Infection
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One study suggested that what percent of shelter dogs in a high-risk area of the United States might have false negatives on a heartworm antigen test due to antigen blocking?

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Quiz: Treating Active Heartworm Infection
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According to the label, IMMITICIDE® (melarsomine dihydrochloride) has been given concurrently with which other classes of medications during clinical field trials without noted adverse drug interactions? 

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Quiz: Treating Active Heartworm Infection
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IMMITICIDE® (melarsomine hydrochloride) is contraindicated in Class 4 heartworm patients—those with active caval syndrome—instead, surgery is the initial treatment of choice. Which is NOT a clinical sign of caval syndrome?

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Quiz: Treating Active Heartworm Infection
10/10  Questions
Multiple Choice Questions
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Quiz: Treating Active Heartworm Infection

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IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION: IMMITICIDE should not be used in dogs with very severe (Class 4) heartworm disease. IMMITICIDE should be administered by deep intramuscular injection in the lumbar (epaxial) muscles (L3–L5) only. Do not use in any other muscle group. Do not use intravenously. Care should be taken to avoid super­ficial injection or leakage. Serious adverse reactions may occur in any dog with heartworm disease due to the killing of heartworms in the pulmonary arteries. Reactions may include thromboembolism, dyspnea, coughing, depression, right side heart failure, and death. Dogs should be cage rested following treatment due to possible thromboembolic disease. Post-injection site reactions (eg, pain, swelling) were the most commonly reported adverse events. See full prescribing information for dosing and administration directions prior to each use of IMMITICIDE. For more information, please see full prescribing information.

 

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